Exhibitions and Events-News

Focusing on important exhibition and activity info of CAFA Art Museum, and updates the latest news of international museum industry.

First Chinese Iconographic Archive Is Launched ...

2019-11-26

The first iconography thesaurus targeted at Chinese art was recently launched by the Victoria and Albert (V&A) Museum. The Chinese Iconography Thesaurus (https://chineseiconography.org) program is led by Zhang Hongxing V&A senior curator in Chinese painting and graphic art, and was established in 2016 under support from the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS). According to Zhang Hongxing via The Art Newspaper China, although iconography can be dated back to a century ago in western art research, it is still underdeveloped in China, where current museum collection catalogues only allows searching by work title, author, time and material.Although the western iconography thesaurus is quite established, it is based on categorization of western art, while some ancient Chinese phrases (for example, “cat”’s alias was “li nu (狸奴)” in ancient China) and unique Chinese cultural concepts, like some concepts from Chinese Buddhism and Daoism, don’t apply to the western system. This also sets the stage for a separate iconography system for Chinese art.The CIT is based on the Iconclass system. Now it’s still a demo, only including 2,688 works of art collected by the V&A Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Palace Museum, and seven categories of over 10,000 keywords in total.“These keywords are not imagined by us out of no where. They are built upon collections, especially records of these collections.” Zhang Hongxing said. His team drew information from ancient records of objects, painting and calligraphy, especially the Shi Qu Library of Treasured Works and Midian Library of Palace Treasures of the Qianlong Emperor’s reign in Qing dynasty, referred to the experience of the Chinese libraries in the early 20th century on transferring ancient books into modern knowledge classification, and extracted keywords manually, as computer-generated keywords still contain many errors.In the future, the CIT program plans to expand its keywords to 30,000 to 40,000, and obtains the access of more museums and libraries’ collection images. Zhang Hongxing hopes the program can become an online library, categorization tool and image gallery for researchers, curators and art buffs.Source | The Art Newspaper ChinaAuthor | Chen LuEdited and translated by Lu Yufan More

Art Engagement and College Curriculum: Strategies for Collection-based Teaching ...

2019-11-22

Liliana Milkova is a curator of academic programs at the Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) of the arts institution Oberlin College in Ohio, USA. The museum houses an encyclopedic collection of over 15,000 objects and has served the academic community across disciplines and programs since its opening in 1917. For years, Milkova and her colleagues have been devoting themselves to placing the museum on the campus map, helping develop effective curricular programs that could maximize the advantage of the museum’s collections regardless of disciplinary focus or course level. In an article for University Museums and Collections Journal, Milkova summarized their experience into some strategies for academic museums and galleries on building successful outreach programs.The Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM) of Oberlin College (Photo via college website) • Create a full-time position for a trained art historian, archeologist, anthropologist or another specialist with interdisciplinary background, deep knowledge of material culture, extensive teaching experience, and dynamic and engaging personal style to conduct outreach to the academic community. • Work with your campus teaching and learning center to determine awareness of and interest in object-based pedagogies among the faculty, as well as the constituencies that would benefit the most from them. • Secure the support of the museum/gallery director and the college/university’s academic deans; be prepared to discuss the benefits of teaching with art and to present data from other institutions. • Develop short informational sessions on teaching with collections and implement them within existing pedagogy workshops, departmental meetings, training sessions, academic gatherings, centers, etc. • Enlist faculty who already have taught with collections to share insights and conduct short teaching demonstrations for their colleagues who can see first-hand the kinds of learning experiences that can be orchestrated for their students. Allow time for discussion and collective brainstorming. • Design museum/gallery workshops specifically geared towards all newly hired faculty and select new staff members. Include interactive components and presentations from current faculty. Conduct workshops before the start of the academic semester, so there is sufficient time for faculty to conceive of and add museum visits to their syllabi. • Establish clear rules or expectations for individual roles when planning and implementing museum class sessions. • Seek investment from the art history and studio art departments in making art accessible and relevant to all academic disciplines and in utilizing tools and methods from art history, an intrinsically interdisciplinary field. Typically the most frequent users of the museum, art history and studio art faculty may feel that expanding the museum’s integration into the curriculum might limit their and their students’ own access to the collection, so it will be helpful to secure their support and assistance early on. • Consider offering social occasions (such as receptions) to bring faculty and senior administrators to the museum and/or financial support (grants, fellowships) to faculty interested in working with curators and the collection to develop museum components for their courses. • Stress to all audiences that collections offer many possibilities beyond content-related connections. Also emphasize that works of art can be used as the vehicles for cultivating or enhancing a variety of skills and thinking dispositions. • Educate key campus populations about your museum/gallery’s operations, why museum rules exists and why they must be followed. • Produce short informational brochures (with concrete examples and useful tips) to distribute to faculty and staff. • Attend general faculty meetings and other events, where useful knowledge can be gained and the museum/gallery presence will be noted. Campus visibility for museum curators and educators is very important. • Consult other academic museum/gallery staff about strategies that have worked for them. • Identify courses with close ties to the collection and contact their instructors with concrete suggestions for artworks and ways to integrate them into the course syllabus. • Create opportunities for faculty from many disciplines to meet and mingle with the curatorial staff – often new ideas and collaborative projects emerge from exactly such situations. • Keep your museum/gallery staff informed about new pedagogies and what makes them effective for millennial learners.Source | University Museums and Collections JournalAuthor | Liliana MilkovaEditor | Lu Yufan More

Upcoming Museum Sim Lets Players Combine Artifacts to Tell Cool Stories ...

2019-11-15

Finally, a museum-themed sim is about to come. Naming the sim Mondo Museum, its designer Michel McBride-Charpentier said it’s intended to represent an ideal version of what museums can be.In the game that is scheduled to come in 2020, players will build and curate museums, mixing and matching artistic and historic objects. McBride-Charpentier said that the game won’t feature any fictional art or fictional history. What’s more, the sim will encourage players to contextualize history by combining different objects across time and regions. For example, McBride-Charpentier plans to put in the game a collection of space-related objects, and players could combine models of the solar system with artifacts from ancient Egypt to show how Egyptians understood astronomy. “The goal is to get players to seeing these relationships between items from separate collections and how they might combine together.” McBride-Charpentier said.McBride-Charpentier said he was inspired by his research trips to prestigious museums in the United States and Canada, especially how those museums mix a variety of objects together. But he also emphasized that the game won’t reflect what the museums currently are, but will be “a more utopian version of what museums should be like” - for example, there won’t be security guards in the game, and players will have to manage the wear and tear on exhibits from handsy visitors themselves; and the game won’t uphold the often exclusionary system of large museums, including the practice of holding onto artifacts that were looted from their countries of origin. If players want to showcase objects from different origins, they will have to ask loans from museums where these items rightly belong, and in order for the loan to succeed, players also need to have their museums checked by the museum directors, to see if it’s good enough to display their items.McBride-Charpentier said he wants to create a game that both satisfies management sim diehards and helps players to see real-life museums in a new light.Source | KotakuAuthor | Gita JacksonEditor | Lu Yufan More

This Wall Was Made for Walking ...

2019-11-06

A wall that walks - this is the latest work by British sculptor, photographer and environmentalist Andy Goldsworthy at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri. Through five stages from March to December, Goldsworthy’s team would move the 100-yard wall inch by inch from an open lawn east of the museum to the museum’s Bloch Building. The wall will then become the museum’s permanent collection.Photo via the artist's websiteWhen Goldsworthy conceived the idea of the “Walking Wall”, it was before US President Donald Trump made a border wall his signature campaign issue, but at the time the work began taking place, people came up to the artist commenting on it as a “political statement”. “It’s nothing to do with it but everything to do with it,” Goldsworthy responded in an interview with PBS News Hour. The walls are witness of history. In Britain, many of the walls date to the Enclosure Acts, when people were put off the land and a lot of them came to America. In Germany, the wall separated East and West Berlin, with some sections still stand today as a reminder of history. And the meaning of Goldsworthy’s “Walking Wall” is more than political or historical. At Stage Two, the wall blocked a four-lane commuter route. For three weeks, people had to take a detour. There were of course unhappy people, but some also said it was interesting, and inspired them to think about their daily boundaries. The work also challenges how the museums interact with the community - rather than trying hard to attracting people to walk inside, the Nelson-Atkins intruded into the public space with its artwork. Photo via the artist's websiteAs an artist, Mr. Goldsworthy is best known for ephemeral works that he creates using materials found in nature. His works are mostly site-specific sculptures and land art situated in natural and urban settings.Source | The New York Times & PBS News Hour & The Nelson-Atkins Museum of ArtWritten by Mark Gardiner and others and compiled by Lu Yufan More

Chinese Museums are Having Creative Product Fever ...

2019-11-01

When the Kangxi, Yongzheng and Qianlong emperors of the Qing dynasty posed solemnly for a formal portrait painting, it perhaps never occurred to them that just in a few hundred years, such meticulously modeled image would be completely subverted into the new “Internet celebrity” amid the creative product consumption trend.The official writings of the Yongzheng Emperor were copied onto folding fans, which are one of the best-sellers of the Palace Museum's online store. The emperor's portrait was also photoshopped into an advertisement. Photo via the Palace Museum Taobao Store's Weibo account.According to a report released in August by the Institute of Cultural Economy at Tsinghua University and Tmall, an artm of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, cultural and creative products from museums have become the latest favor of consumers. From 2017 to 2019, the sales of cultural products on Tmall alone increased by three times. Museums' stores on the platform reported an increase of six times during the period. In 2018, museums’ Tmall shops received 1.6 billion visits, 1.5 times the trips people made to brick-and-mortar museums across the country. Among the online visitors, about 100 million are born after 1990.It’s no doubt that the museum creative product fever has arrived in China. This reflects not only in the enthusiasm of leading Chinese museums, such as the Palace Museum and the Suzhou Museum, in development of a variety of creative products based on their unique intellectual property; but also the entering of many prestigious foreign museums, led by the British Museum and the V&A Museum, in China’s e-commerce platforms. The phenomenon shows a major transformation of the museums’ mindset, from reacting to visitors to initiating contact with the public. Museums seem to have found balance between solemnity and playfulness on the e-commerce platforms: They can sell both exquisite replicas of their feature collections, and products that feature cute cartoon history figures.Screen capture of the British Museum's Chinese e-storeYin Zhisong, Deputy Director of the Institute of Cultural Creativity Development at Tsinghua University, said that good creative products of museums are capable of transforming the essence of traditional culture, and allowing the public to get in touch with cultural heritage in their daily life. He is optimistic about the crossover cooperation between museums and the Internet companies: “Internet companies could help innovate museums’ historical and cultural background in more diverse perspectives, and museums could help enrich people’s digital life. Museums could thus attract more visitors, and provide them with more lively experience.”But there are also voices pointing out the gap between the cultural and creative industry in China and in western countries. For one thing, some consumers have complained that the assimilation of museums’ creative products could cause aesthetic fatigue. “Museums shouldn’t be satisfied about pleasing the public with cute products,” Yin acutely pointed out, “they should dig deeper into their cultural genes.” According to him, museums should set up intellectual property gallery based on extensive, academic research work, recreate stories based on history, think out of the box of “exhibition souvenirs”, and recruit professional designers to combine the museums’ cultural genes with people’s lifestyle, to design products that are more sustainable.Source | People’s Daily / China DailyAuthor | Yuan Shenggao / Zou YatingCompiled by Lu Yufan More

Unpacking 263,000 visitor photos at the Royal Ontario Museum ...

2019-10-21

Since 2012, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Canada has been displaying visual user generated content (UGC) in the museum, encouraging people to take and share photos of the museum at their special event, Friday Night Live. While text-based Twitter walls were common at events, it was not the case with photo-based walls. As a result, the museum’s attendance has increased by 10-20% year over year since 2012. It proved that people enjoyed making interactions with their own devices rather than taking part in other more complicated activities.Upon realizing that leveraging UGC and their visitors’ networks to tell the story of what it is like to visit the museum could catalyze purchasing and visiting decisions, the ROM made the photo wall a permanent display, placed a gallery of UGC on their homepage for potential visitors, and even changed their photography policy, allowing photography to happen both in permanent galleries and special exhibitions. For the first time ever, people could see the visiting experience from the visitors’ perspective, instead of the museum’s. What’s more, the UGC photo wall is both cost-effective and democratic, in a way that it’s much less expensive than museum apps and complies better with visitors’ original habits.Photo by @joshuabestFrom 2014 to January 2018, the ROM aggregated 263,693 photos shared by its visitors. In order to understand what the visitors are sharing, so as to allow the museum to be smarter about the digital engagement programs and think deeper about the connection between the physical and digital visit, the museum’s digital engagement strategists Ryan Dodge and Jacqueline Waters used the Google Cloud Vision API, to classify the images and automatically attach tags or keywords to each photo. The API generated 2.5 million tags, with some photos having up to more than 30 tags. After weeks or organizing and digging in, they eventually found some patterns of the images, explaining what visitors like to photograph in the museum:ArchitectureThis theme looks obvious to the researchers, as the museum is very photogenic itself. 51% of the photos have one of the tags in the graph below.PeopleTo the researchers’ surprise, there are not many photos of children even though the majority of the visitors visit in group. 27% of the photos have a tag connected to the tags in the graph below.PhotographyMuseums are full of opportunities for amazing photos and for the visitors to create art, and it’s no wonder that 38% of the photos have an artistic tag. The museum is proud of the natural light in many galleries, and the way that sunlight dances on the museum, so it makes the researcher glad to see the tag of “light” in the UGC collection. To their surprise, only 8,647 photos, which is 3.3% of the collection, were tagged with selfie.ArtifactsMuseums are naturally a good place for people to perform their nature to collect. 78% of the photos were tagged with a term relating to an object on display in the museum. Taking photos of artifacts in a museum is how some people engage today, so that they can share them online and with their friends and family to talk about their experience, save memories and collect things that interest them.Dinosaurs10% of the photos had Dinosaurs tags attached with them. It’s expectable because they are big, can’t be seen everyday, and are something interesting to talk about after visit.Photo by @jkakisSource | Museum-iDAuthor | Ryan Dodge, Digital Engagement, Royal Ontario MuseumEditor | Lu Yufan More

MoMA Reboots after $450 Expansion: Will the New Space Sparkle New Imagination? ...

2019-10-12

The Museum of Modern Art reopens on Oct. 21 after a $450-million, 47,000-square-foot expansion. With a Diller, Scofidio + Renfro /Gensler extension added to the 2004 building designed by Yoshio Taniguchi, the MoMA will be a mammoth complex that’s nearly blocklong.From 1939 till today, the art museum on the 53rd Street has gone through six revamps. The re-opening of MoMA once again triggered discussions among critics in terms of the “grow or die” museum mentality, which was prevalent in the 1990s and 2000s.The remodeled 53rd Street main entrance to the Museum of Modern Art with the new canopy, and buildings to the west. Credit Winnie Au for The New York TimesCritic Holland Cotter believes that judging from the art fairs, more art is not more, yet agile planning and alert seeing can be a game changer. According to him, the expanded MoMA is making obvious efforts to reshape its “Modernism Plus” image without going entirely off-brand - a further breakthrough from its “white, male and nationalist” obsolete history, with art from Africa, Asia, South America and African America and more women artists added.To go into details, the art history outline that MoMA is famous for, the “ironclad view of Modern art as a succession of marquee ‘isms’ (Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, etc.)”, is still in place in the collection galleries. But there are now more unexpected inclusions and theme-based detours along the main route. Cotter also hailed the new building’s mechanics for development, as the new MoMA calls for regular rotation of the collection - a third of the galleries on the second, fourth and fifth floors will be reinstalled every six months, and the new composition of artworks, especially in a museum with increasingly diversified collections and curatorial staff from increasingly diversified backgrounds, will sparkle new thinking.The new acoustic space at MoMA with “Rainforest V,” a sonic sculpture by David Tudor and Composers Inside Electronics Inc. Credit Winnie Au for The New York TimesHowever, what Cotter finds a promising expansion is “one of those classic, ruthless New York real estate tales” in critic Michael Kimmelman’s eyes. The new canopy that cantilevers over the 53rd Street sidewalk, the raised ceiling of Mr. Taniguchi’s lobby on the south side, the gift shop moved to the basement that now allows unobstructed views toward the new West Wing, even the “Hello. Again.” painted on the white wall in the lobby, a 2013 work by Haim Steinbach, were all sharply compared by Kimmelman to “an Apple store“.The new lobby at MoMA features “hello again,” a 2013 work by Haim Steinbach. Credit Haim Steinbach and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery. Winnie Au for The New York TimesHe mourned the marginalization of the garden, which is “the historical heart of MoMA” that helped make the place feel friendlier, and the fact that MoMA is no longer what its former director Richard Oldenburg described - “a place where you can see the whole development of the modern movement, but which you feel you can still capture, at least remotely, on a single visit”. Instead of doubling down on Midtown Manhattan, Kimmelman said he was expecting MoMA to venture further to Brooklyn or Queens or the West Side. While New York is multi-centered now, by doing so MoMA could have altered the city’s cultural weather. However, Mr. Kimmelman does acknowledge that the multiple entry points that pepper the circuit of permanent collection galleries reflect the time when the story of modern art is no longer told as a linear sequence of -isms, and more diverse histories of modernism can be discovered in the new space.Source | The New York TimesEdited by Lu Yufan based on MoMA Reboots With ‘Modernism Plus’ by Holland Cotter and With a $450 Million Expansion, MoMA Is Bigger. Is That Better? By Michael Kimmelman More

A Museum ‘Dating’ App Helps Visitors Fall in Love with Art ...

2019-09-27

The High Museum of Art in Atlanta, America has successfully discovered a way to engage its visitors - with its new phone app that mashes up art and dating app released this Valentine’s Day.The High Museum of Art's Heartmatch appJust like its promotion slogan “Part game, part functional. It’s Tinder, but for art” described, the app named Heartmatch simply requires the user to interact with the museum’s collections like finding dates on Tinder - swipe right if they like the work, swipe right if they don’t.In order to maintain the wholesomeness of collections shown on the app without boring the users, the museum decided to show 100 works on the app, and pop up a map of the museum with all the works the user “liked” marked on it every seven images or so. The user could choose to visit now, send the map to their email as a pre-plan for later visit, or ignore the map and continue swiping.The concept was born in a meeting, where a curator of the museum suddenly came up with the idea. For the museum, engaging the visitors is not the only goal. There were three goals: First, they wanted to show on-site visitors the diversity of their collection; Second, they wanted to direct them to artworks they liked so they could experience the works in person; Third, they wanted to collect data on their visitors’ tastes. For example, the most liked works could be used in marketing materials, and the least popular works could be used in educational programming. In this way, the museum also aims to turn “swipe lefts” to “swipe rights”.In order to increase the app’s use, the museum chose to make a progressive web app instead of a native app that requires downloading. What’s more, they also directed a series of marketing efforts to it, such as producing a short video for the museum’s various social media platforms to generate excitement while showing the visitors know-how of the app; creating business cards specially of the app, to be distributed to visitors; and adding promotional signs near ticket desk, stairwells, elevators and on official website pages.Author | Julia Forbes and Ivey Rucket, High Museum of ArtSource | American Alliance of MuseumsEditor | Lu Yufan More

Female Artists Made Little Progress in Museums Over the Past Decade ...

2019-09-20

Only 11 percent of all acquisitions and 14 percent of exhibitions at 26 prominent American museums over the past decade were of work by female artists, a joint investigation by artnet News and In Other Words discovered.What rings an alarm is that although museums claim that they are embracing alternative histories and diversities, the number of works by women acquired decreased from 10 years ago. The problem is even more serious for encyclopedic museums, which collect fewer works by female than modern and contemporary museums.Barbara Kruger, Belief+Doubt, 2012, at the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden. ©Barbara Kruger. Photo: Cathy CarverThere are a number of reasons why museums have failed to increase their representation of female artists. For one thing, their work is often seen as a pursuit parallel to the authoritative art history, while many institutions held an unspoken belief that “they will only be recognized as an important institution if they acknowledge the greatest hits,” said Maxwell Anderson, the president of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. Such bias may further be consolidated by the museums’ past collections.Another reason is a lack of research about female artists. One example is a recent study by Yale School of Art students, which discovered that although graduation rates reached parity in 1980s, female alumni were written about in books and academic publications two to three times less than their male peers.While museum collections is an important record of history, the bias in gender may have great impact on how the posterity understand the past. However, it is often challenging for curators to convince their acquisition committees to purchase the work, especially by older, overlooked female artists, who usually lack auction history that could be a reference for validation of the asking price. Moreover, as museum collections rely markedly on donated work, the museums had to go with the trend that people tend to buy male artists.For the museums, striving for parity is not only a matter of doing the right thing, or telling a more accurate history, but also a significant method to ensure their relevance and financial sustainability.“The public that you are selling to is not monolithic - it is not all white males,” commented Susan McPherson, founder of McPherson Strategies consultancy and an expert on corporate social responsibility. “So if your viewpoint is narrow, you won’t be able to grow membership and your customer base.”Opening for “Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future.” Photo: Paul Rudd © Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationHowever, while some museums, such as the Baltimore Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, made their moves by selling works by canonized white men to diversify their collections, there are also some opposite voices, arguing that putting a gender quota on the museum’s acquisitions might lead to too much attention on gender instead of the work’s quality. Responding to this doubt, artist Micol Hebron said: “I think we are going to have conversations that are uncomfortable for a lot of people about quotas. There has been a quota of more men than women for centuries.”Source | artnetAuthor | Julia Halperin & Charlotte BurnsEditor | Lu Yufan More

A New Definition of “Museum” Sparks International Debate ...

2019-09-05

The British MuseumThe forthcoming International Council of Museums (ICOM)’s 25th General Conference will witness members voting for a new museum definition. Before that, a new definition proposed by Jette Sandahl, Danish curator who leads ICOM’s commission on the new definition, has sparked international controversy.Believing that the current museum definition, adopted at ICOM’s 22nd General Assembly in Austria in 2007 (Check the definition here), lacks “language of the 21st century” by ignoring demands of “cultural democracy“, Sandahl amended the definition that reads as follows:“Museums are democratizing, inclusive and polyphonic spaces for critical dialogue about the pasts and the futures. Acknowledging and addressing the conflicts and challenges of the present, they hold artifacts and specimens in trust for society, safeguard diverse memories for future generations and guarantee equal rights and equal access to heritage for all people.Museums are not for profit. They are participatory and transparent, and work in active partnership with and for diverse communities to collect, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit, and enhance understandings of the world, aiming to contribute to human dignity and social justice, global equality and planetary wellbeing.”The proposal soon pulls criticisms, many from professionals in museology. Juliette Raoul-Duval, chair of ICOM France, denounced it as an “ideological” manifesto. Hugues de Varine, a former director of ICOM and an early upholder of the “new museology” movement in the 1970s, was reported by the Art Newspaper to be surprised by the “over inflated verbiage” of an “ideological preamble,” which does not identify a museum from a cultural center, library or laboratory.François Mairesse, professor at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and the chair of the International Committee of Museology, also criticized the proposal as “a statement of fashionable values”, which is “much too complicated and partly aberrant“, far from a definition that is supposed to be “a simple and precise sentence characterizing an object”. She then told the Art Newspaper: “it would be hard for most French museums, starting with the Louvre, to correspond to this definition, considering themselves as ‘polyphonic spaces’.” Her opinion is shared by many critics who regard the new definition as too political and too vague for defining museums. Not only do the professionals disapprove of the new definition, as the Museums Association posted the definition on its Twitter account with a poll, there are also 62% of the 226 votes against it.ICOM also has also called for new museum definitions from the public around the world since April. While there are 269 entries listed on their website, the proposed definition was not chosen from any of these submissions but picked internally by Sandhal’s commission. The voting will take place in Kyoto, Japan on September 7.Author | Zachary SmallSource | HyperallergicEditor | Lu Yufan More

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CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

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This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

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During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

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According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

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and Statement

CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

CAFA Art Museum Event Safety Disclaimer

Article I

This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

Article II

Event participants must abide by the laws and regulations of the People’s Republic of China, as well as moral and ethical norms. All participants must demonstrate good character, respect for others, friendship, and a willingness to help others.

Article III

Event participants should be adults (people 18 years or older with full civil legal capacity). Underage persons must be accompanied by an adult.

Article IV

Event participants undertake all liability for their personal safety during the event, and event participants are encouraged to purchase personal safety insurance. Should an accident occur during an event, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for the accident, but both have the obligation to provide assistance. Event participants should actively organize and implement rescue efforts, but do not undertake any legal or economic liability for the accident itself. The museum does not undertake civil or joint liability for the personal safety of event participants.

Article V

During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

Article VI

Event participants will participate in the event under the guidance of museum staff and event leaders or instructors and must correctly use the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities provided for the event. If a participant causes injury or harm to him/herself or others while using the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, or causes the damage or destruction of the tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, the event participant must undertake all related liability and provide compensation for the financial losses. Persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for personal accidents.

CAFA Art Museum Portraiture Rights Licensing Agreement

According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

I. General Provisions

(1) Party A is the portraiture rights holder in this agreement. Party A voluntarily licenses its portraiture rights to Party B for the purposes stipulated in this agreement and permitted by law.

(2) Party B (CAFA Art Museum) is a specialized, international modern art museum. CAFA Art Museum keeps pace with the times, and works to create an open, free, and academic space and atmosphere for positive interaction with groups, corporations, institutions, artists, and visitors. With CAFA’s academic research as a foundation, the museum plans multi-disciplinary exhibitions, conferences, and public education events with participants from around the world, providing a platform for exchange, learning, and exhibition for CAFA’s students and instructors, artists from around the world, and the general public. As a public institution, the primary purposes of CAFA Art Museum’s public education events are academic and beneficial to society.

(3) Party B will photograph all CAFA Public Education Department events for Party A.

II. Content, Forms of Use, and Geographical Scope of Use

(1) Content. The content of images taken by Party B bearing Party A’s likeness include: ① CAFA Art Museum ② CAFA campus ③ All events planned or executed by the CAFAM Public Education Department.

(2) Forms of Use. For use in CAFA’s publications, products with CDs, and promotional materials.

(3) Geographical Scope of Use

The applicable geographic scope is global.

The media in which the portraiture may be used encompasses any media that does not infringe upon Party A’s portraiture rights (e.g., magazines and the internet).

III. Term of Portraiture Rights Use

Use in perpetuity.

IV. Licensing Fees

The fees for images bearing Party A’s likeness will be undertaken by Party B.

After completion, Party B does not need to pay any fees to Party A for images bearing Party A’s likeness.

Additional Terms

(1) All matters not discussed in this agreement shall be resolved through friendly negotiation between both parties. Both parties may then sign a supplementary agreement, provided it does not violate any laws or regulations.

(2) This agreement comes into effect on the date that it is signed (sealed) and the relevant boxes are selected by Party A and Party B.

(3) This agreement exists in paper and electronic forms. The paper form is made in duplicate, with Party A and Party B each retaining one copy with the same legal efficacy.

Event participants implicitly accept and undertake all the obligations stated in this agreement. Those who do not consent will be seen as abandoning the right to participate in this event. Before participating in this event, please speak to your family members to obtain their consent and inform them of this disclaimer. After participants sign/check the required box, participants and their families will be seen as having read and agreed to these terms.

I have carefully read and agree to the above provisions.

Group Visit Agreement
and Statement

CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

CAFA Art Museum Event Safety Disclaimer

Article I

This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

Article II

Event participants must abide by the laws and regulations of the People’s Republic of China, as well as moral and ethical norms. All participants must demonstrate good character, respect for others, friendship, and a willingness to help others.

Article III

Event participants should be adults (people 18 years or older with full civil legal capacity). Underage persons must be accompanied by an adult.

Article IV

Event participants undertake all liability for their personal safety during the event, and event participants are encouraged to purchase personal safety insurance. Should an accident occur during an event, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for the accident, but both have the obligation to provide assistance. Event participants should actively organize and implement rescue efforts, but do not undertake any legal or economic liability for the accident itself. The museum does not undertake civil or joint liability for the personal safety of event participants.

Article V

During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

Article VI

Event participants will participate in the event under the guidance of museum staff and event leaders or instructors and must correctly use the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities provided for the event. If a participant causes injury or harm to him/herself or others while using the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, or causes the damage or destruction of the tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, the event participant must undertake all related liability and provide compensation for the financial losses. Persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for personal accidents.

CAFA Art Museum Portraiture Rights Licensing Agreement

According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

I. General Provisions

(1) Party A is the portraiture rights holder in this agreement. Party A voluntarily licenses its portraiture rights to Party B for the purposes stipulated in this agreement and permitted by law.

(2) Party B (CAFA Art Museum) is a specialized, international modern art museum. CAFA Art Museum keeps pace with the times, and works to create an open, free, and academic space and atmosphere for positive interaction with groups, corporations, institutions, artists, and visitors. With CAFA’s academic research as a foundation, the museum plans multi-disciplinary exhibitions, conferences, and public education events with participants from around the world, providing a platform for exchange, learning, and exhibition for CAFA’s students and instructors, artists from around the world, and the general public. As a public institution, the primary purposes of CAFA Art Museum’s public education events are academic and beneficial to society.

(3) Party B will photograph all CAFA Public Education Department events for Party A.

II. Content, Forms of Use, and Geographical Scope of Use

(1) Content. The content of images taken by Party B bearing Party A’s likeness include: ① CAFA Art Museum ② CAFA campus ③ All events planned or executed by the CAFAM Public Education Department.

(2) Forms of Use. For use in CAFA’s publications, products with CDs, and promotional materials.

(3) Geographical Scope of Use

The applicable geographic scope is global.

The media in which the portraiture may be used encompasses any media that does not infringe upon Party A’s portraiture rights (e.g., magazines and the internet).

III. Term of Portraiture Rights Use

Use in perpetuity.

IV. Licensing Fees

The fees for images bearing Party A’s likeness will be undertaken by Party B.

After completion, Party B does not need to pay any fees to Party A for images bearing Party A’s likeness.

Additional Terms

(1) All matters not discussed in this agreement shall be resolved through friendly negotiation between both parties. Both parties may then sign a supplementary agreement, provided it does not violate any laws or regulations.

(2) This agreement comes into effect on the date that it is signed (sealed) and the relevant boxes are selected by Party A and Party B.

(3) This agreement exists in paper and electronic forms. The paper form is made in duplicate, with Party A and Party B each retaining one copy with the same legal efficacy.

Event participants implicitly accept and undertake all the obligations stated in this agreement. Those who do not consent will be seen as abandoning the right to participate in this event. Before participating in this event, please speak to your family members to obtain their consent and inform them of this disclaimer. After participants sign/check the required box, participants and their families will be seen as having read and agreed to these terms.

I have carefully read and agree to the above provisions.

Event Booking Form

Name:
Gender
Phone:
Valid Certificate: Identity Card
ID Number:
Email:

Reminder:

Hello! Thank you for participating in our public education event and we are looking forward to seeing you! If you cannot attend the event on time, please send a text message to 13261936837 (Liang) to cancel the booking. Please be aware that your eligibility for using the quick booking may be affected If you cancel the booking more than three times. Thank you for your understanding!
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