Exhibitions and Events-News

Focusing on important exhibition and activity info of CAFA Art Museum, and updates the latest news of international museum industry.

Lecture Info | Rethinking Video Art: The Materiality and Technicality of Video Installation / Sculpture ...

2019-10-11

Time: Oct. 13, 2019 13:00-18:00 Place: CAFAM Lecture Hall / Conference Room More

CAFAM Lecture Info |The Art of the Quantum Universe: Time, Consciousness and Chaos ...

2019-10-08

2019 Leonardo Art, Science and Technology Lecture SeriesThe Art of the Quantum Universe: Time, Consciousness and ChaosSpeaker: Paul ThomasDate: 10.10.2019 ThursdayTime: 18:30-20:00Language: English (with Chinese translation)Venue: CAFA Art MuseumCo-organized by CAFA Visual Art Innovation Institute,CAFA Center for Art and Technology, CAFA Art Museum, Chronus Art Center In collaboration with Leonardo / ISAST | About the Lecture | This talk will explore the synchronicity taking place between science and art in dealing with the speculative nature of the quantum universe. We are entering an age denoting a much broader paradigm shift away from the concrete and indivisible era towards an age defined by uncertainty. The talk is grounded in the contention that the quantum ‘turn’ in relatively recent developments of twentieth-century theoretical physics is denotative of a much broader paradigm shift in culture. The shift away from determinism and is reflected in experimental art of the modern era and into the present.The philosopher Henri Bergson, a major thinker on time at the beginning of the twentieth century, will be discussed in connection to current thinking on quantum time. Artists and scientists were attempting to visualise the invisible world in the early twentieth century. For example, Etienne Jules Marey influenced Cubism and Futurism with his chronophotographic indexical traces of movement, effectively making time visible. Since then, scientific imaging technology has advanced to where we are now: witnessing the mechanistic visualisation of the atomic world.My work as an artist contributes to this lineage. The artwork Quantum Consciousness (2016) is an audio-visualisation of atomic data that indexes the quantum "movement" of a phosphorus electron. Quantum Consciousness visualises the co-emergence of thought-data (viewer) and quantum-data (electron). The scientific research informing the work was conducted in collaboration with quantum physicist Professor Andrea Morello. Morello's research looks at controlling the spin of electrons and nuclei for the development of the processor in the quantum computer. The media artwork Quantum Chaos (2019) visualises quantum phenomena by exploring the liminal space between the classical and quantum world.The quantum world is hard to comprehend but science has revealed that it is fundamental to the core of our existence. The paradox of the quantum superposition (best articulated in the Schrodinger's Cat thought experiment) exists as an actual and empirical condition in which an electron occupies multiple positions in space simultaneously, but none specifically. This paper will ask questions relevant to artistic practice focused on quantum phenomena such as atomism, speed, time and the Epicurean swerve.  | About the Speake r | Dr Paul Thomas is a Professor at University of New South Wales, Art and Design and currently the Director of the Studio for Transdisciplinary Art Research (STAR) as well as the co-chair of the Transdisciplinary Imaging Conference series 2010-2018. In 2000 he instigated and was the founding Director of the Biennale of Electronic Arts Perth 2002, 2004 and 2007.His art practice takes not only inspiration from nanoscience and quantum theory, but actually operates there. Previous artworks exploring nanotechnologies and quantum phenomena have also been exhibited nationally and Internationally. ‘Quantum Consciousness’ was a visualisation of a quantum spin created from data of me reading sections of Feynman’s 1982 paper ‘Simulating Physics with Computers’, affecting the spin of a single electron. ‘Multiverse’ 2013 based on Richard Feynman’s diagrams on photons reflecting from a mirror, ‘Nanoessence’ 2009 which explored the space between life and death at a nano level and ‘Midas’ 2007 which researched what is transferred when skin touches gold. His current publication Quantum Art and Uncertainty (October 2018) and Nanoart: The Immateriality of Art (2013) are based on the concept that at the core of both art and science we find the twin forces of probability and uncertainty. He is currently editing the ‘Artist and Practice’ volume for the forthcoming ‘Encyclopedia of New Media Art’, Bloomsbury Press.《Quantum Art and Uncertainty》 (2018)The Immersive Vision TheatreTechnical support Luke ChristisonPhotography Mike PhillipsMultiverse(2012) More

A Museum ‘Dating’ App Helps Visitors Fall in Love with Art ...

2019-09-27

The High Museum of Art in Atlanta, America has successfully discovered a way to engage its visitors - with its new phone app that mashes up art and dating app released this Valentine’s Day.The High Museum of Art's Heartmatch appJust like its promotion slogan “Part game, part functional. It’s Tinder, but for art” described, the app named Heartmatch simply requires the user to interact with the museum’s collections like finding dates on Tinder - swipe right if they like the work, swipe right if they don’t.In order to maintain the wholesomeness of collections shown on the app without boring the users, the museum decided to show 100 works on the app, and pop up a map of the museum with all the works the user “liked” marked on it every seven images or so. The user could choose to visit now, send the map to their email as a pre-plan for later visit, or ignore the map and continue swiping.The concept was born in a meeting, where a curator of the museum suddenly came up with the idea. For the museum, engaging the visitors is not the only goal. There were three goals: First, they wanted to show on-site visitors the diversity of their collection; Second, they wanted to direct them to artworks they liked so they could experience the works in person; Third, they wanted to collect data on their visitors’ tastes. For example, the most liked works could be used in marketing materials, and the least popular works could be used in educational programming. In this way, the museum also aims to turn “swipe lefts” to “swipe rights”.In order to increase the app’s use, the museum chose to make a progressive web app instead of a native app that requires downloading. What’s more, they also directed a series of marketing efforts to it, such as producing a short video for the museum’s various social media platforms to generate excitement while showing the visitors know-how of the app; creating business cards specially of the app, to be distributed to visitors; and adding promotional signs near ticket desk, stairwells, elevators and on official website pages.Author | Julia Forbes and Ivey Rucket, High Museum of ArtSource | American Alliance of MuseumsEditor | Lu Yufan More

CAFAM Lecture Info | Design Research Lecture Series: Sarah Teasley ...

2019-09-24

Two lectures of the Design Research Lecture Series - Global Design History and Urgent Issues Facing Design History - will take place at CAFA Art Museum on Sep 25 and 26. More

CAFAM Workshop | "Liu Xian: Wood-Engraving Master" Exhibition Workshop Series ...

2019-09-21

Building New China, 9x10cm, Wood-engraving, 1949I would like to express my love and hatred with painting.I love art more than my life.- Liu Xian"Liu Xian: Wood-engraving Master" exhibition opens at CAFAM on September 18, 2019. Mr. Liu devoted his life to wood-engravng art, and is an artist that has made great contribution to Chinese printmaking and art in general. He not only challenged the wood-engraving art, but also created a great deal of wood-engraving works in his life. The Department of Public Education of CAFA Art Museum has planned a series of public events to interpret Mr. Liu's academic ideas.All The Other Flowers of the Hundred Flowers Blossom series, Liu Xian, Wood-engraving, 19581"Liu Xian's History with Wood-engraving" sharing sessionTime: 2019.09.20 18:30-20:00Venue: Multi-functional Conference Room, CAFAMSpeaker: Wang Renyin| About the Speaker |Ms. Wang Renyin is Mr. Liu Xian's only child. She is a researcher and promotor of Mr. Liu's work and life.| About the Session |Mr. Liu Xian is an important figure of modern Chinese art history. He persisted in wood-engraving art creation, built the root of wood-engraving in China for further development, and created many popular artworks. This session will show us Mr. Liu's art creation, and his affection for wood-engraving, from the perspective of a family member and a researcher.Note: The session is free of charge.Consolidate Unity, Fight to the End, Liu Xian, Wood-engraving, 9cm x 11cm, 19382"Flowers: From Literati's Refined Taste to Daily Life" LectureTime: 2019.09.21 10:00-12:00Venue: Multi-functional Conference Room, CAFAMSpeaker: Rao Xiang| About the Speaker |Rao Xiang, Doctor of Letters of Peking University, deputy chief editor of Wenhui Supplement of Guangming Daily, specially invited researcher at the National Muesum of Modem ChineseLiterature. His published works include the books Back to Literature Itself and On the Public Affairs and Private Emotions. He has received awards including the China News Award. He is interested in tending flowers and plants in his leisure time.| About the Lecture |In 1958, renowned poet Guo Moruo published his poem series "Hundred Flowers Blossom", chanting about one hundred flowers with one hundred poems, which echoed with the social and political situation of the time, and futher attracted painters to compete to create illustrations for the series. The People's Daily Publishing House later published the anthology of Hundred Flowers Blossom, including engraving works by Liu Xian and other artists. Why did Guo Moruo create the series? How do we examine the poems and the engravings today? Flowers seem to have a natural, close relationship with poems, paintings, literati and artists, so that art is usually connected with the flower appreciation activities. From appreciating flowers to planting them, flowers as an object of appreciation could reflect the typical desire for beauty of the people.Note: The lecture is free of charge.Mimosa of the Hundred Flowers Blossom series, Liu Xian, Wood-engraving, 1959Cockscomb of the Hundred Flowers Blossom series, Liu Xian, Wood-engraving, 19593The History of the "International Wood-Engraving"Time: 2019.09.21 14:00-16:00Venue: Multi-functional Conference Room, CAFAMSpeaker: Yang Hongwei| About the Speaker |Deputy Director of the Department of Printmaking, CAFA, professor and artist.| About the Event |Professor Yang Hongwei is a top-notch wood-engraving scholar and artist in China. The lecture will play the documentary film "International Wood-engraving" for the first time, introduce the history and development of wood-engravng, and the latest progress of the wood-engraving on the international stage, to give the audience an idea of the classic but less known art form of wood-engraving.Note: The event is free of charge.Crime and Punishment I: Moscow, Liu Xian, 9×10cm, Wood-engravingWhite Night (Work of Dostoevsky) Illustration No.6 (10 in total), 10×9cm, Wood-engraving, 1935 More

Female Artists Made Little Progress in Museums Over the Past Decade ...

2019-09-20

Only 11 percent of all acquisitions and 14 percent of exhibitions at 26 prominent American museums over the past decade were of work by female artists, a joint investigation by artnet News and In Other Words discovered.What rings an alarm is that although museums claim that they are embracing alternative histories and diversities, the number of works by women acquired decreased from 10 years ago. The problem is even more serious for encyclopedic museums, which collect fewer works by female than modern and contemporary museums.Barbara Kruger, Belief+Doubt, 2012, at the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden. ©Barbara Kruger. Photo: Cathy CarverThere are a number of reasons why museums have failed to increase their representation of female artists. For one thing, their work is often seen as a pursuit parallel to the authoritative art history, while many institutions held an unspoken belief that “they will only be recognized as an important institution if they acknowledge the greatest hits,” said Maxwell Anderson, the president of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. Such bias may further be consolidated by the museums’ past collections.Another reason is a lack of research about female artists. One example is a recent study by Yale School of Art students, which discovered that although graduation rates reached parity in 1980s, female alumni were written about in books and academic publications two to three times less than their male peers.While museum collections is an important record of history, the bias in gender may have great impact on how the posterity understand the past. However, it is often challenging for curators to convince their acquisition committees to purchase the work, especially by older, overlooked female artists, who usually lack auction history that could be a reference for validation of the asking price. Moreover, as museum collections rely markedly on donated work, the museums had to go with the trend that people tend to buy male artists.For the museums, striving for parity is not only a matter of doing the right thing, or telling a more accurate history, but also a significant method to ensure their relevance and financial sustainability.“The public that you are selling to is not monolithic - it is not all white males,” commented Susan McPherson, founder of McPherson Strategies consultancy and an expert on corporate social responsibility. “So if your viewpoint is narrow, you won’t be able to grow membership and your customer base.”Opening for “Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future.” Photo: Paul Rudd © Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationHowever, while some museums, such as the Baltimore Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, made their moves by selling works by canonized white men to diversify their collections, there are also some opposite voices, arguing that putting a gender quota on the museum’s acquisitions might lead to too much attention on gender instead of the work’s quality. Responding to this doubt, artist Micol Hebron said: “I think we are going to have conversations that are uncomfortable for a lot of people about quotas. There has been a quota of more men than women for centuries.”Source | artnetAuthor | Julia Halperin & Charlotte BurnsEditor | Lu Yufan More

A New Definition of “Museum” Sparks International Debate ...

2019-09-05

The British MuseumThe forthcoming International Council of Museums (ICOM)’s 25th General Conference will witness members voting for a new museum definition. Before that, a new definition proposed by Jette Sandahl, Danish curator who leads ICOM’s commission on the new definition, has sparked international controversy.Believing that the current museum definition, adopted at ICOM’s 22nd General Assembly in Austria in 2007 (Check the definition here), lacks “language of the 21st century” by ignoring demands of “cultural democracy“, Sandahl amended the definition that reads as follows:“Museums are democratizing, inclusive and polyphonic spaces for critical dialogue about the pasts and the futures. Acknowledging and addressing the conflicts and challenges of the present, they hold artifacts and specimens in trust for society, safeguard diverse memories for future generations and guarantee equal rights and equal access to heritage for all people.Museums are not for profit. They are participatory and transparent, and work in active partnership with and for diverse communities to collect, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit, and enhance understandings of the world, aiming to contribute to human dignity and social justice, global equality and planetary wellbeing.”The proposal soon pulls criticisms, many from professionals in museology. Juliette Raoul-Duval, chair of ICOM France, denounced it as an “ideological” manifesto. Hugues de Varine, a former director of ICOM and an early upholder of the “new museology” movement in the 1970s, was reported by the Art Newspaper to be surprised by the “over inflated verbiage” of an “ideological preamble,” which does not identify a museum from a cultural center, library or laboratory.François Mairesse, professor at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and the chair of the International Committee of Museology, also criticized the proposal as “a statement of fashionable values”, which is “much too complicated and partly aberrant“, far from a definition that is supposed to be “a simple and precise sentence characterizing an object”. She then told the Art Newspaper: “it would be hard for most French museums, starting with the Louvre, to correspond to this definition, considering themselves as ‘polyphonic spaces’.” Her opinion is shared by many critics who regard the new definition as too political and too vague for defining museums. Not only do the professionals disapprove of the new definition, as the Museums Association posted the definition on its Twitter account with a poll, there are also 62% of the 226 votes against it.ICOM also has also called for new museum definitions from the public around the world since April. While there are 269 entries listed on their website, the proposed definition was not chosen from any of these submissions but picked internally by Sandhal’s commission. The voting will take place in Kyoto, Japan on September 7.Author | Zachary SmallSource | HyperallergicEditor | Lu Yufan More

Autism in Museums: A Revolution in the Making ...

2019-08-28

Diversity, equity, accessibility - these qualities of modern museums require them to attend to the needs of neurodiverse visitors and staff. Clarie Madge, founder of the UK-based Autism in Museums, shares her view on how museums should do to support autistic visitors and employees.For Madge, mother of two autistic children, it was mind blowing when her family visited the Early Birds at the Science Museum event in 2012: Opening early at 8 a.m., the event was specially designed for people with autistic spectrum, with number of visitors kept low, visual support for visitors well provided, staff all trained in autism awareness and the museum environment well attended - for example, the museum turned off loud interactive media and hand dryers in the restrooms.As a family with autistic members, it is not easy to enjoy a family day out. The fantastic experience at Science Museum made Madge realize how much the autistic families need such event, and how important it is for the museums to learn how to support autistic visitors. She then founded Autism in Museums, working with museums to make them a more accessible space for the autistic.Early Birds at the Science MuseumWhat does it mean to be autism-friendly? Firstly, the museums should avoid crowded hours, overly bright or dark galleries, loud interactive media and audio triggered without warning. They also need to highlight unwritten rules, such as what one can or cannot touch.While most museums don’t have the condition to do early opening, they can instead provide materials that allow autistic visitors to prepare in advance for a visit, so as to reduce anxiety over visiting a new place. Examples include Museum of English Rural Life’s visual story and sensory map of their galleries, collaborated with local autism groups, as well as Google Streetview tour on its website.Except from the increase of physical accessibility, it is of the same importance for museums to think about displays and interpretation of artworks, as 44-52% of autistic people have learning difficulties.Autism in Museums has by far cooperated with museums including the National History Museum and the V&A, to support their programming for autism families. Madge believes that by creating an accessible environment for the autistic people, the museums are also benefiting from it, as autistic visitors often prove to be incredibly loyal, have an intense focus on a particular topic, and are potential to be future volunteers and staff members. Author | Claire Madge, founder of Autism in MuseumsSource | American Alliance of MuseumsEdited by Lu Yufan More

Collections & Communities: Royal Museum Greenwich Staff on Innovations in Endeavor Galleries Project ...

2019-07-31

To celebrate the 250th anniversary of Captain James Cook’s Endeavor voyage, Royal Museums Greenwich launched the Endeavor Galleries Project, opened a new purpose-built collections and created four permanent galleries in the National Maritime Museum’s East Wing in 2018.The four galleries - Tudor and Stuart Seafarers, Pacific Encounters, Polar Worlds and Sea Things - examine how people ventured beyond Britain’s shores to explore the world, and how Britain and its people were transformed by their encounters with explorers from other parts of the world. But instead of providing a new store and display of objects, the Museum views the project as a chance to break through the traditional museum ideology, to become a museum for everyone - by removing the barriers to make the museum more accessible, creating community ownership, representing invisible histories and collaborating to create a social and inspiring space.Tudor & Stuarts Seafaring gallery. Image courtesy of the National Maritime Museum & Casson MannRemoving Barriers in the GalleriesRemoving intellectual, physical and cultural barriers and facilitating access were fundamental to the Endeavor Galleries’ design. Visitors want to experience a ‘sense of place’; things through which they could connect emotionally to the stories within each gallery, points of engagement that they could relate to their own lives and spaces to interact socially with friends and family. The four galleries try to achieve this goal via different approaches. The Tudor and Stuart Seafarers seeks the design approach both dramatic (using dark woods and moody lighting) and rich with intriguing juxtapositions of objects, audio-visual interventions and graphics; The Polar Worlds tries to evoke harsh and cold atmosphere in the space with display cases in the shape of huge ice blocks. It also aims to improve the visitors’ engagement by including contemporary performance by Inuit artist Tanya Tagaq, storytelling by an Inuit or female polar scientist (instead of the traditional male), and space to rest, gather and discuss the issues facing the polar regions today; The Pacific Encounters intends to create a sense of place by metaphorically ‘flooding’ the gallery: two animated, sculptural waves are greeting the visitors in the gallery, with accessible seating strategically placed to enhance the experience; Sea Things accommodates as many objects as possible and allow visitors to get up close and even touch the real exhibits. There’s a large digital seashore that washes across and between the objects in the gallery, and multiple interactive activities such as ‘Sea People’, a co-curation project working with underrepresented communities to question what is missing from the discourse.Sea Things gallery. Image courtesy of the National Maritime Museum and Casson Mann © Hufton+CrowCollection Access Beyond DisplayOther than ensuring the access to the objects on display, the museum also offers ‘behind-the-scene’ tours, handling sessions, seminars and workshops,  from introductory to in-depth, at its Prince Philip Maritime Collections Center. All of the five conservation studios (frames, objects, paintings, paper and textiles) are designed to accommodate a large group of visitors who can observe conservation closely without interrupting the work.Polar Worlds gallery. Image courtesy of the National Maritime Museum & Casson MannCreating Community Ownership and Representing Invisible HistoriesWhile developing the new galleries, the museum consulted over 28,000 individuals from local, national and international communities, to explore the potential of its rich collections. Not only does the museum encourages debates and conversations between communities and specialists, it also sets up co-curation projects with local schools, colleges, community groups and societies, which creates opportunities for alternative interpretations and new ideas of familiar stories, objects, galleries and museums.Community consultation also focuses on the review of design and content, to prevent inaccessible design solutions, from font sizes, illustrations, audio visual design to the overall look and feel of each gallery, with advices from the audience.Other than community collaboration and consultation, the project also adopts flexible approaches, such as artist commission, to uncover invisible histories and new perspectives (for example of women, BAME, LGBT and disabled people) on familiar narratives.With the Endeavor Project, the Royal Museums Greenwich aims to create a transformative and meaningful experience shaped by its audiences and communities, a space that is inspiring, engaging and relevant, where the visitors could truly feel they belong.Source | Museum iDAuthor | Mike Sarna, Director, Collections & Public Engagement (former); Gail Symington, Director, Collections & Public Engagement; Sarah Lockwood, Head of Learning & Interpretation; Birthe Christensen, Head of Conservation & Preservation (former); Philippa Mackenzie, Head of Collections Management (former),Royal Museums GreenwichEditor | Lu Yufan More

CAFAM Lecture | The Break-in of Illusion into the Heart of Reality: Leandro Erlich's Spatial Installations ...

2019-07-18

"Leandro Erlich: The Confines of the Great Void" Academic Activities: The Break-in of Illusion into the Heart of Reality: Leandro Erlich's Spatial Installations Speaker: Heinz-Norbert Jocks Time: 2019/7/20 14:00 Venue: Auditorium Room, CAFA Art Museum More

Child Public Education Reservation Form

I agree to the Group Visit Agreement and Statement Please agree to the Group Visit Agreement.
Submit

Adult Public Education Event Reservation Form

I agree to the Group Visit Agreement and Statement Please agree to the Group Visit Agreement.
Sumbit

Group Public Education Event Reservation Form

I agree to the Group Visit Agreement and Statement Please agree to the Group Visit Agreement.
Submit

Group Visit Agreement
and Statement

CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

CAFA Art Museum Event Safety Disclaimer

Article I

This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

Article II

Event participants must abide by the laws and regulations of the People’s Republic of China, as well as moral and ethical norms. All participants must demonstrate good character, respect for others, friendship, and a willingness to help others.

Article III

Event participants should be adults (people 18 years or older with full civil legal capacity). Underage persons must be accompanied by an adult.

Article IV

Event participants undertake all liability for their personal safety during the event, and event participants are encouraged to purchase personal safety insurance. Should an accident occur during an event, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for the accident, but both have the obligation to provide assistance. Event participants should actively organize and implement rescue efforts, but do not undertake any legal or economic liability for the accident itself. The museum does not undertake civil or joint liability for the personal safety of event participants.

Article V

During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

Article VI

Event participants will participate in the event under the guidance of museum staff and event leaders or instructors and must correctly use the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities provided for the event. If a participant causes injury or harm to him/herself or others while using the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, or causes the damage or destruction of the tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, the event participant must undertake all related liability and provide compensation for the financial losses. Persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for personal accidents.

CAFA Art Museum Portraiture Rights Licensing Agreement

According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

I. General Provisions

(1) Party A is the portraiture rights holder in this agreement. Party A voluntarily licenses its portraiture rights to Party B for the purposes stipulated in this agreement and permitted by law.

(2) Party B (CAFA Art Museum) is a specialized, international modern art museum. CAFA Art Museum keeps pace with the times, and works to create an open, free, and academic space and atmosphere for positive interaction with groups, corporations, institutions, artists, and visitors. With CAFA’s academic research as a foundation, the museum plans multi-disciplinary exhibitions, conferences, and public education events with participants from around the world, providing a platform for exchange, learning, and exhibition for CAFA’s students and instructors, artists from around the world, and the general public. As a public institution, the primary purposes of CAFA Art Museum’s public education events are academic and beneficial to society.

(3) Party B will photograph all CAFA Public Education Department events for Party A.

II. Content, Forms of Use, and Geographical Scope of Use

(1) Content. The content of images taken by Party B bearing Party A’s likeness include: ① CAFA Art Museum ② CAFA campus ③ All events planned or executed by the CAFAM Public Education Department.

(2) Forms of Use. For use in CAFA’s publications, products with CDs, and promotional materials.

(3) Geographical Scope of Use

The applicable geographic scope is global.

The media in which the portraiture may be used encompasses any media that does not infringe upon Party A’s portraiture rights (e.g., magazines and the internet).

III. Term of Portraiture Rights Use

Use in perpetuity.

IV. Licensing Fees

The fees for images bearing Party A’s likeness will be undertaken by Party B.

After completion, Party B does not need to pay any fees to Party A for images bearing Party A’s likeness.

Additional Terms

(1) All matters not discussed in this agreement shall be resolved through friendly negotiation between both parties. Both parties may then sign a supplementary agreement, provided it does not violate any laws or regulations.

(2) This agreement comes into effect on the date that it is signed (sealed) and the relevant boxes are selected by Party A and Party B.

(3) This agreement exists in paper and electronic forms. The paper form is made in duplicate, with Party A and Party B each retaining one copy with the same legal efficacy.

Event participants implicitly accept and undertake all the obligations stated in this agreement. Those who do not consent will be seen as abandoning the right to participate in this event. Before participating in this event, please speak to your family members to obtain their consent and inform them of this disclaimer. After participants sign/check the required box, participants and their families will be seen as having read and agreed to these terms.

I have carefully read and agree to the above provisions.

Group Visit Agreement
and Statement

CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

CAFA Art Museum Event Safety Disclaimer

Article I

This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

Article II

Event participants must abide by the laws and regulations of the People’s Republic of China, as well as moral and ethical norms. All participants must demonstrate good character, respect for others, friendship, and a willingness to help others.

Article III

Event participants should be adults (people 18 years or older with full civil legal capacity). Underage persons must be accompanied by an adult.

Article IV

Event participants undertake all liability for their personal safety during the event, and event participants are encouraged to purchase personal safety insurance. Should an accident occur during an event, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for the accident, but both have the obligation to provide assistance. Event participants should actively organize and implement rescue efforts, but do not undertake any legal or economic liability for the accident itself. The museum does not undertake civil or joint liability for the personal safety of event participants.

Article V

During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

Article VI

Event participants will participate in the event under the guidance of museum staff and event leaders or instructors and must correctly use the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities provided for the event. If a participant causes injury or harm to him/herself or others while using the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, or causes the damage or destruction of the tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, the event participant must undertake all related liability and provide compensation for the financial losses. Persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for personal accidents.

CAFA Art Museum Portraiture Rights Licensing Agreement

According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

I. General Provisions

(1) Party A is the portraiture rights holder in this agreement. Party A voluntarily licenses its portraiture rights to Party B for the purposes stipulated in this agreement and permitted by law.

(2) Party B (CAFA Art Museum) is a specialized, international modern art museum. CAFA Art Museum keeps pace with the times, and works to create an open, free, and academic space and atmosphere for positive interaction with groups, corporations, institutions, artists, and visitors. With CAFA’s academic research as a foundation, the museum plans multi-disciplinary exhibitions, conferences, and public education events with participants from around the world, providing a platform for exchange, learning, and exhibition for CAFA’s students and instructors, artists from around the world, and the general public. As a public institution, the primary purposes of CAFA Art Museum’s public education events are academic and beneficial to society.

(3) Party B will photograph all CAFA Public Education Department events for Party A.

II. Content, Forms of Use, and Geographical Scope of Use

(1) Content. The content of images taken by Party B bearing Party A’s likeness include: ① CAFA Art Museum ② CAFA campus ③ All events planned or executed by the CAFAM Public Education Department.

(2) Forms of Use. For use in CAFA’s publications, products with CDs, and promotional materials.

(3) Geographical Scope of Use

The applicable geographic scope is global.

The media in which the portraiture may be used encompasses any media that does not infringe upon Party A’s portraiture rights (e.g., magazines and the internet).

III. Term of Portraiture Rights Use

Use in perpetuity.

IV. Licensing Fees

The fees for images bearing Party A’s likeness will be undertaken by Party B.

After completion, Party B does not need to pay any fees to Party A for images bearing Party A’s likeness.

Additional Terms

(1) All matters not discussed in this agreement shall be resolved through friendly negotiation between both parties. Both parties may then sign a supplementary agreement, provided it does not violate any laws or regulations.

(2) This agreement comes into effect on the date that it is signed (sealed) and the relevant boxes are selected by Party A and Party B.

(3) This agreement exists in paper and electronic forms. The paper form is made in duplicate, with Party A and Party B each retaining one copy with the same legal efficacy.

Event participants implicitly accept and undertake all the obligations stated in this agreement. Those who do not consent will be seen as abandoning the right to participate in this event. Before participating in this event, please speak to your family members to obtain their consent and inform them of this disclaimer. After participants sign/check the required box, participants and their families will be seen as having read and agreed to these terms.

I have carefully read and agree to the above provisions.

Group Visit Agreement
and Statement

CAFA Art Museum Publication Authorization Agreement

I fully agree to CAFA Art Museum (CAFAM) submitting to CAFA for publication the images, pictures, texts, writings, and event products (such as works created during participation in workshops) related to me from my participation in public events (including museum member events) organized by the CAFA Art Museum Public Education Department. CAFA can publish these materials by electronic, web, or other digital means, and I hereby agree to be included in the China Knowledge Resource Bank, the CAFA Database, the CAFA Art Museum Database, and related data, documentation, and filing institutions and platforms. Regarding their use in CAFA and dissemination on the internet, I agree to make use of these rights according to the stated Rules.

CAFA Art Museum Event Safety Disclaimer

Article I

This event was organized on the principles of fairness, impartiality, and voluntary participation and withdrawal. Participants undertake all risk and liability for themselves. All events have risks, and participants must be aware of the risks related to their chosen event.

Article II

Event participants must abide by the laws and regulations of the People’s Republic of China, as well as moral and ethical norms. All participants must demonstrate good character, respect for others, friendship, and a willingness to help others.

Article III

Event participants should be adults (people 18 years or older with full civil legal capacity). Underage persons must be accompanied by an adult.

Article IV

Event participants undertake all liability for their personal safety during the event, and event participants are encouraged to purchase personal safety insurance. Should an accident occur during an event, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for the accident, but both have the obligation to provide assistance. Event participants should actively organize and implement rescue efforts, but do not undertake any legal or economic liability for the accident itself. The museum does not undertake civil or joint liability for the personal safety of event participants.

Article V

During the event, event participants should respect the order of the museum event and ensure the safety of the museum site, the artworks in displays, exhibitions, and collections, and the derived products. If an event causes any degree of loss or damage to the museum site, space, artworks, or derived products due to an individual, persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for losses. The event participant must negotiate and provide compensation according to the relevant legal statutes and museum rules. The museum may sue for legal and financial liability.

Article VI

Event participants will participate in the event under the guidance of museum staff and event leaders or instructors and must correctly use the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities provided for the event. If a participant causes injury or harm to him/herself or others while using the painting tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, or causes the damage or destruction of the tools, materials, equipment, and/or facilities, the event participant must undertake all related liability and provide compensation for the financial losses. Persons not involved in the accident and the museum do not undertake any liability for personal accidents.

CAFA Art Museum Portraiture Rights Licensing Agreement

According to The Advertising Law of the People’s Republic of China, The General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and The Provisional Opinions of the Supreme People’s Court on Some Issues Related to the Full Implementation of the General Principles of the Civil Law of the People’s Republic of China, and upon friendly negotiation, Party A and Party B have arrived at the following agreement regarding the use of works bearing Party A’s image in order to clarify the rights and obligations of the portrait licenser (Party A) and the user (Party B):

I. General Provisions

(1) Party A is the portraiture rights holder in this agreement. Party A voluntarily licenses its portraiture rights to Party B for the purposes stipulated in this agreement and permitted by law.

(2) Party B (CAFA Art Museum) is a specialized, international modern art museum. CAFA Art Museum keeps pace with the times, and works to create an open, free, and academic space and atmosphere for positive interaction with groups, corporations, institutions, artists, and visitors. With CAFA’s academic research as a foundation, the museum plans multi-disciplinary exhibitions, conferences, and public education events with participants from around the world, providing a platform for exchange, learning, and exhibition for CAFA’s students and instructors, artists from around the world, and the general public. As a public institution, the primary purposes of CAFA Art Museum’s public education events are academic and beneficial to society.

(3) Party B will photograph all CAFA Public Education Department events for Party A.

II. Content, Forms of Use, and Geographical Scope of Use

(1) Content. The content of images taken by Party B bearing Party A’s likeness include: ① CAFA Art Museum ② CAFA campus ③ All events planned or executed by the CAFAM Public Education Department.

(2) Forms of Use. For use in CAFA’s publications, products with CDs, and promotional materials.

(3) Geographical Scope of Use

The applicable geographic scope is global.

The media in which the portraiture may be used encompasses any media that does not infringe upon Party A’s portraiture rights (e.g., magazines and the internet).

III. Term of Portraiture Rights Use

Use in perpetuity.

IV. Licensing Fees

The fees for images bearing Party A’s likeness will be undertaken by Party B.

After completion, Party B does not need to pay any fees to Party A for images bearing Party A’s likeness.

Additional Terms

(1) All matters not discussed in this agreement shall be resolved through friendly negotiation between both parties. Both parties may then sign a supplementary agreement, provided it does not violate any laws or regulations.

(2) This agreement comes into effect on the date that it is signed (sealed) and the relevant boxes are selected by Party A and Party B.

(3) This agreement exists in paper and electronic forms. The paper form is made in duplicate, with Party A and Party B each retaining one copy with the same legal efficacy.

Event participants implicitly accept and undertake all the obligations stated in this agreement. Those who do not consent will be seen as abandoning the right to participate in this event. Before participating in this event, please speak to your family members to obtain their consent and inform them of this disclaimer. After participants sign/check the required box, participants and their families will be seen as having read and agreed to these terms.

I have carefully read and agree to the above provisions.

Event Booking Form

Name:
Gender
Phone:
Valid Certificate: Identity Card
ID Number:
Email:

Reminder:

Hello! Thank you for participating in our public education event and we are looking forward to seeing you! If you cannot attend the event on time, please send a text message to 13261936837 (Liang) to cancel the booking. Please be aware that your eligibility for using the quick booking may be affected If you cancel the booking more than three times. Thank you for your understanding!
Quick loginAccount login
  • Mobile phone number will be your login ID
  •  
Use Artron membership to login